Miami's local Haitian Artists

The Creative. May 01, 2021

Miami's local Haitian Artists

South Florida is entangled in the Caribbean nation's presence, as it has one of the highest Haitian communities in the United States. Haitian culture is a hallmark of Miami culture, from an eponymous neighborhood, Little Haiti, that once served as a sanctuary for Haitian exiles to the cuisine, music, and Haitian Creole dialect

that encircles South Florida jargon.

 

Miami's music is varied and significant in the world of music. The Greater Miami area has long been a hotspot with a wide range of musical styles. South Florida, for instance, was a centre for Southern Rap. In specific,

Miami is a centre for Latin Music in the United States.

Kiddo Marv

His quick-witted lyricism and flexible beats have won him features from Miami's elite, including City Girls, Major Nine, Ball Greezy, and Denzel Curry. Kiddo Marv has fast become a trend with three albums — Kingz in Denial Don't Overcome I and II and Dirty Laundry — thanks to the infectious sound, which combines Haitian guitars kompa-style with the distinctive rhythms of his hometown. Marv's tendency to flop from a syrupy mix of singing and rapping to his smooth cadence, all while offering unfiltered lyrics about marriages and his roots, owes everything to Wyclef Jean and Sam Sneak.

Jessie Woo

Jessie Woo is best known for her social media satire skits focusing on Haitian childhood. Last year her debut R&B record Moods of a Cancer was released, pairing her comic chops with a silky vocal range that perfectly match the sexy undertone of the song. The album was called "ZoZo's Appointment" ("Fill Me Up" and "Unattainable"). The album seems to display the whole struggle of falling in love on a summer holiday. It expresses the longing remembrance that is still just out of reach to laugh at narrative hookup scripts and dance along with the rhythm of a kompa and a reggae.

FSO Dinero

the newest recruit for Slip-N-Slide, is a Fly Shit Only collective and a resident of Broward County. He has taken up a natural flow that synonymized Southern rap, citing Lil Wayne and Cash Money Records as influences. He uses a dark, fast-forwarded production to underpin his lust and street experiences in his 2019 debut album, Color Money. Color Money proves this rookie can compete with his South rap contemporaries by the remarkable features of City Girls, Zoey Dollaz and Lil Dirk.

Dyna Edyne

can sing hypnotic melodies on a hip-hop and R&B track or get a hip-hop rhythm in a freestyle ("FTN"). Her diversity leaves people anticipating what's next because she refused to be locked in by R&B's restrictions. Her debut EP in 2017, Branches, featured Edyne's experimental productions and vocal talents, both seemingly aligned with a decades-long music base. Edyne appears to be part of the black musicians who continue to translate the tradition of those who have gone before them, under the influence of Jill Scott and Janelle Monáe, Erykah Badu, Rihanna and Beyoncé.

Laurenee Gauvin

raised in Haiti to a French mother and a Haitian father immense yourself in her amazing art creations. Surrounded by Haitian art growing up, she draws much of her inspiration from her father’s art, daily struggles and emotions and simply a way to deal with things. Laurenee doesn’t view art as a hobby rather a form of therapy. She had a very strong support system with her family rooting her on and encouraging her to never give up on her dreams as an artist.